Beware of Lumbriculus variegatus

Posted By on January 27, 2006

Black wormLumbriculus what????
There is a rapidly spreading computer virus call “blackworm” which is beginning to spread quickly through internet email infecting PCs around the world. So far security experts estimate some 300+ thousand computers are already infected and that many more have receive emails containing the virus. What makes this virus a bit more concerning is that instead of just tying up email servers like many recent virus concerns, this one is potentially destructive.

The “blackworm” virus is scheduled to trigger on February 3rd and if the experts are correct, will begin to destroy data on the infected computers. The virus attack and will obliterate files created by Word, Excel, Power Point, Acrobat PDF as well as several other formats including ZIP compressed files.

What can you do?
An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure: First, be savy about opening email attachments as this is how most viruses spread. It has already appeared in various forms and some of its common subject headers are: hot movie, miss lebanon 2006, My photos, Fwd: image.jpg, Fw: Sexy, Fw: Real show, Fwd: Crazy illegal sex and dsc 00465.jpeg. Attachments are known to read: WinZip.BHX, DSC-00465.plf, New_Document_file.plf, eBook.pdf, eBook. PIF, Video_part.mim, Atta[001].zip.SCR, Attachments001.BHX and WinZip.zip.sCR. One should assume that many other ‘containers’ and subject are being proliferated and that the above are not the only threats.

One way many users have been able to detect if their computers are infected is when a ZIP file suddenly appears on their desktop, or if they are unable to update their antivirus software. One thing you can do is to be doubly sure to run current updates to your current virus detection software when they become available or as Apple users might suggest … switch to a Mac.
😉
For more pertinent, check with your antivirus providers website.

UPDATE:
MP3 Audio detailing virus from WSJ. (right click/save as)

Comments

Desultory - des-uhl-tawr-ee, -tohr-ee

  1. lacking in consistency, constancy, or visible order, disconnected; fitful: desultory conversation.
  2. digressing from or unconnected with the main subject; random: a desultory remark.