North American International Auto Show nears …

Posted By on January 3, 2006

NAIAS
For those of us that enjoy automobiles, January is a big month of the year as auto shows debut with the gigantic North American International Auto Show in Michigan. The automotive journalist will get the first look, followed by the industry folks and finally the doors open to the public on January 14th – 22nd. Approximately 7000 journalist from around the world will cover the event in a few short days followed by an estimated 800 thousand people.

Originally the Detroit Auto Show, the exhibit has been held every year since 1907 with the exception of WWII and several years following; it was only renamed the North American International Auto Show in 1989. The show has been held in the 700,000 square foot area of Cobo Center since 1965 and has grown to include an international audience.

This is a big show and the economic impact to southeastern Michigan is even bigger … second to hosting an Olympics as far as an infusion of dollars. It is bigger than the Superbowl, the World Series, the Kentucky Derby or the Oscars! It even has more economic impact than other well known automotive events like the Daytona or Indianapolis 500. The only other Michigan event that came close was the Ryders Cup which only generates about 1/5 of the revenue. The combined the economic impact of the auto show, along with hosting this year’s Superbowl, will bring approximately 1 billion dollars to southeastern Michigan. (now if I could only aid the ailing American automotive companies … that would really help!)

If you are reasonably close and enjoy cars, consider a trip to the NAIAS this year. Further information in regard to tickets, dates and pricing can be found at the NAIAS website.

Did you know: There is enough carpet used in the displays to cover 750 football fields? Wow!

Comments

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  1. lacking in consistency, constancy, or visible order, disconnected; fitful: desultory conversation.
  2. digressing from or unconnected with the main subject; random: a desultory remark.