Air travel and the annoyances of flying cattle class

Posted By on December 15, 2014

Airbus patent filing

Before we complain about today’s airline comfort, look at what Airbus might be considering. Yikes!

Expedia posted a lighthearted polling of what annoys airline passengers which got me thinking about what I notice and where I may offend. I already do my best to be overly attentive to most of these annoyances, but probably would rank “The Aromatic Passenger” as #1 followed by the “Back Seat Grabber” as my #2 complaint … but like most passengers, have never made an issue about them, besides a glance in their direction (thinking about the back of the seat grabbing).

The full list of the most annoying flier types went as follows:

  1. Rear Seat Kicker (cited by 67% of study respondents)
  2. Inattentive Parents (64%)
  3. The Aromatic Passenger (56%)
  4. The Audio Insensitive (talking or music; 51%)
  5. The Boozer (50%)
  6. Chatty Cathy (43%)
  7. Carry-On Baggage Offenders (39%)
  8. The Armrest Hog (38%)
  9. Seat-Back Guy (the seat recliner) (37%)
  10. The Queue Jumper (rushes to deplane) (35%)
  11. Overhead Bin Inconsiderate (stows bag in first available spot, rather than nearest to his/her seat; 32%)
  12. Pungent Foodies (32%)
  13. Back Seat Grabber (31%)
  14. Playboy (reads or watches adult content; 30%)
  15. The Amorous (inappropriate affection levels; 29%)
  16. Mad Bladder (window seat passenger who makes repeat bathroom visits; 28%)
  17. Undresser (removes shoes, socks or more; 26%)
  18. The Seat Switcher (13%)

And how do fliers react when they encounter etiquette-busting seatmates?

When asked how they would react if a fellow passenger misbehaved on a flight, 48% of those queried said they would remain quiet and attempt to ignore the violation. However, nearly a quarter—22%—said they’d confront a misbehaving passenger directly.

Beyond that, 12% said they’d record the incident using a mobile phone or a camera and 6% said they’d then try to shame the offending passenger on social media

As for the seat-kickees, 44% of the survey respondents said they’d address a parent if their child was kicking their seat.

Overall, however, fliers appeared to take an optimistic tone regarding their fellow passengers. The survey found 78% agreed with the statement that “for the most part, fellow passengers are considerate of other passengers.”

Comments

  • Jim Monroe III

    Any airline that makes me sit in a bike saddle will never have me booking a ticket. What’s next, standing?

Desultory - des-uhl-tawr-ee, -tohr-ee

  1. lacking in consistency, constancy, or visible order, disconnected; fitful: desultory conversation.
  2. digressing from or unconnected with the main subject; random: a desultory remark.