A battery hack has revived the analog Triplett meter

Posted By on April 27, 2016

TripletMeter630PLInstructio

A leftover weekend project was to see if I could get my dad’s old Triplett 630PL meter back to working shape. As a boy, I remember "carefully" using "his" meter when I was in junior high school and attempting to build Heathkit projects … ZenithTransOceaniclike my shortwave radio. Thankfully I never has to depend o the homemade radio since I had a Zenith TransOceanic … which I still have to this day! What is interesting is that I now live where we could ONCE see the Voice of America towers (Bethany Rely Station) before they were taken down (the Cold War was over). Some great history and memories listening to VOA and other shortwave radio stations as a kid.

Back to reviving the old analog meter: Although the meter was in great shape and kept in its original boxes (with instruction book!), the 2 batteries inside the meter didn’t hold up so well. Thankfully no corrosion that did any damage and replacing looked to be simple … UNTIL trying to find an Eveready Energizer 413A 30 volt transistor battery … $37 ?? Yikes!

Thankfully there is a simpler solution. Put three 9 volt transistor batteries in series and the 27+ volts works great. Eveready30vBatteryHackWhew … now at an ultra-long life "D" battery to the mix and put the case back together.

IT WORKS GREAT!

TripletMeter160425

Comments

  • Anne

    Hi Rich! Glad you were able to get that old tester up and running again! My dad was an old-time New England Tel guy, and I still have all his tools (including an old Triplett analog meter too!). I hope you get many more generations out of your unit.

    Regards,
    Anne T.
    Product Specialist
    Triplett Test Equipment

    • I still like watching analog needles move so having this meter on my workbench frees up my cheapy “small” digital meter to travel in the toolbox. Still pondering eventually picking up a higher end digital with amp-clamp? (someday)

      Thanks for the comment Anne.

Desultory - des-uhl-tawr-ee, -tohr-ee

  1. lacking in consistency, constancy, or visible order, disconnected; fitful: desultory conversation.
  2. digressing from or unconnected with the main subject; random: a desultory remark.