A welcomed update from Twitter to 280 characters for tweets

Posted By on November 8, 2017

It might not seem like a monumental decision, but Twitter upped their 140 character limit to 280 yesterday … so it was kind of a big deal. One of the core attributes for those of us using the popular social networking tool is the brevity and discipline required to communicate with a limited number of characters. It often constrained communicating and required creativity in relaying information or making comments. Many opted to include images of text or multipart messages (ie. 1/5 or photo).

TweetWithText

Tweeting Made Easier    by Aliza Rosen

Tuesday, 7 November 2017

In September, we launched a test that expanded the 140 character limit so every person around the world could express themselves easily in a Tweet. Our goal was to make this possible while ensuring we keep the speed and brevity that makes Twitter, Twitter. Looking at all the data, we’re excited to share we’ve achieved this goal and are rolling the change out to all languages where cramming was an issue.*

During the first few days of the test many people Tweeted the full 280 limit because it was new and novel, but soon after behavior normalized (more on this below). We saw when people needed to use more than 140 characters, they Tweeted more easily and more often. But importantly, people Tweeted below 140 most of the time and the brevity of Twitter remained.

Highlights are below and in our additional blogs about our experimentation process, extensive data analysis, research, and design work.

TwitterLaunchChart171107

MORE on the Twitter Blog

Comments

Desultory - des-uhl-tawr-ee, -tohr-ee

  1. lacking in consistency, constancy, or visible order, disconnected; fitful: desultory conversation.
  2. digressing from or unconnected with the main subject; random: a desultory remark.