Wrinkly-Nosed Tooth-Faced Shark – accurate, but not polite

| July 28, 2019

Who wants to go swimming?  The Great White Shark can detect blood in the water up to 3 miles away! Just look at those expensive teeth. I watched several science programs regarding space and the Apollo 11 moon landing these past couple of weeks … and one the other night explaining the Big Bang theory […]

A story with 2 of my favorite subjects–photography and space

| July 27, 2019

A lot of things needed to go right when NASA sent three astronauts rocketing towards the moon in July of 1969 … but one real close call happened after their safe return to earth. It seems, some of the iconic photographs were “almost lost to posterity,” explains Zeiss, the company that provided the lenses for […]

Fifty years ago NASA launched Apollo 11 in our race to land a man on the moon in the 1960s

| July 16, 2019

In the space race with the Soviet Union (USSR) during the 1960s, the United States “rocketed” ahead on July 16, 1969 as NASA sent the three men of Apollo 11, Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins into space at 9:32AM EST. The Apollo command module and Lunar Module (LM) sat atop the huge 363-feet […]

Book: Moondust – In Search of the Men Who Fell to the Earth

| July 14, 2019

As we approach the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11 landing on the moon in 1969, I’ve been enjoying both television anniversary shows, articles and the book Moondust – In Search of the Men Who Fell to the Earth. The Andrew Smith book, in particular, has been enjoyable as it blends events from the author’s memory […]

From “One Giant Leap” boldness, to “Interstellar” brain cramps

| June 15, 2019

Brenda and I watched the movie Interstellar (2014) once before, but we watched it again this past week, and as often happens, we picked up on a few more interesting facts that made our brains hurt … well at least mine: General relativity, The Science of Interstellar, Black Holes and Time Warps. Thankfully I could […]

The Moon and planets gave me a show tonight in Cincinnati

| June 14, 2019

With the colder weather and clear sky over Cincinnati late Thursday evening and Friday morning this week, I took my Lumix GX-8 camera and 100-300mm lens out in the backyard to see what I could photograph. Not much as expected from Jupiter, but I think I could make out a couple moons in the pixelated […]

Shuttle launch observed from the International Space Station

| April 21, 2019

Happy Easter … He Is Risen. He Is Risen Indeed! The resurrection of Jesus and His “ascension” to heaven is a vision we can only imagine. When I’m too busy to blog, a beautiful photo from space works well as an Easter post. Here’s a photo from the International Space Station (#ISS) just after a […]

Aviation progress is poised to take-off

| January 4, 2019

Aviation has bogged in the last few decades, but with computer assisted quadrotors, private space ventures and renewed supersonic travel … perhaps the next couple decades with be inspirational? Supersonic jets may be about to make a comeback – Reinventing Concorde

ISS & FaceTime with Annalyn brightens an otherwise sour day

| October 11, 2018

With the stock market tumble on Wednesday and Hurricane Michael ravaging Florida’s Panhandle, I was in the mood to post something positive … but what?  Dow Industrials plunge more than 800 points, Nasdaq loses 4% in biggest decline in months I contemplated talking about how impressive it was to view the International Space Station (ISS) […]

An impressive look at planet Jupiter this week #space

| July 14, 2018

It was a great week of skywatching in our backyard in Cincinnati this week. The sun magnificently lit up planets, especially Saturn and Jupiter while Mars, Venus (the brightest) and Mercury (doubtful) remained a bit low in the sky while I was out viewing. I was purposely out for Mars, but it will have to […]

Successful SpaceX FalconHeavy rocket launch from Florida

| February 6, 2018

Watched an excellent SpaceX launch from  Launch Complex 39A at Kennedy Space Center in Florida this Tuesday afternoon as Elon Musk’s private rocket company is only second in payload capacity to NASA’s ancient SaturnV rocket. Everything, including the landing of their twin booster rockets were fantastic. We are definitely entering a new era in space […]

Astronauts may soon be eating goo from their poo

| January 30, 2018

It’s a long way to Mars and there’s "not a drop to drink" (author Mindy McGinnis) or "plop to eat" on the way … so what’s the plan? Since astronauts are already recycling their urine into drinkable water, the next step should be obvious: "Goo made from their Poo." (in observing the current lab conditions […]

The Apollo 14 mission and a long distance technical support call

| September 3, 2017

What a great story told by YouTuber Scott Manley about the early days of NASA, their Apollo 14 computing problem and a "tech support call" to a programmer (video below). The story is longish and likely only of interest for those on the geeky side who work with computer or are programmers — it would […]

Ready to check out the August 21, 2017 total solar eclipse?

| August 21, 2017

The last time our continent had a total solar eclipse was 1991 and so getting a chance to view 2017’s is a rare opportunity. Not everybody will be traveling to the “belted area” across the country, but most will have a chance to see a partial eclipse. According to NASA, “an estimated 500 million people […]

Stratolaunch emerges from the hanger

| June 3, 2017

Stratolaunch, cited as the "world’s largest plane," has been under construction for four years, but is finally ready to come out of the hanger. The plane has a wingspan larger than a football field and according to the design firm Stratolaunch Systems, is designed to carry rockets into the stratosphere before firing the payload into […]

Merry Christmas and God bless all of us on the good Earth

| December 24, 2016

— The Apollo 8 Christmas Eve Broadcast Apollo 8, the first manned mission to the Moon, entered lunar orbit on Christmas Eve, December 24, 1968. That evening, the astronauts; Commander Frank Borman, Command Module Pilot Jim Lovell, and Lunar Module Pilot William Anders did a live television broadcast from lunar orbit, in which they showed […]

Neil Armstrong memories … he would have been disappointed

| November 11, 2016

A lot has changed in the 11 years that have passed since I posted on “First Man” Neil Armstrong … but after re-watching the 60 Minutes clip and pondering going “back to the moon and to Mars by 2018,” Armstrong would have been disappointed as a lot hasn’t changed. Click for post from 11/11/2005 WHY […]

The moon passing between climate observatory and earth

| July 28, 2016

Astronaut Rick Mastracchio (‏@AstroRM) posts some terrific space oriented photos. Here’s one showing he moon passing between the NASA climate observatory and earth. As he tweets, "almost unbelievable that this is a real photo."

Memories: Deep Impact Mission inside Comet Tempel 1 #TBT

| January 22, 2015

My wife has been busy cleaning out our closets and getting rid of “old stuff.” One the the items dates back in 2003 and brought back memories of my “space girl.”  My daughter Katelyn was inspired by science and particularly by an adventurous NASA, space exploration and astronomy. In part, her interest could have been […]

This has not been the week for U.S. space oriented vehicles

| October 31, 2014

The debris photos are starting to show up on the Internet on Twitter after the Virgin Galactic SpaceShipTwo prototype was lost after its first powered test since January. The crash of this suborbital “passenger carrying” spaceship happened at the Mojave Air and Space Port in California according to officials. Two pilots were aboard the craft […]

Spectacular images from NASA and the Hubble Space Telescope

| September 5, 2014

Having an interest and studying a little bit of astronomy with my daughter when she was a teenager, I can’t help but share this spectacular Hubble Space Telescope image from NASA Goddard’s pix feed showing the galaxy PGC 54493 in the constellation of Serpens (The Serpent). Click for larger as its definitely worth seeing full […]

Are you prepared for a Coronal Mass Ejection – CME?

| July 25, 2014

Did you know that in July of 2012 that the earth was nearly hit by a CME (video)? According to the Nation Academy of Sciences, the cost of a large CME similar to the July 20, 2012 “storm” could cost $2 Trillion. On July 23, 2012, the sun unleashed two massive clouds of plasma that barely […]

Great ISS over Europe photo

| November 2, 2013

The movie Gravity and an ISS demonstration from space

| October 21, 2013

If you are looking forward to seeing the new Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc. space oriented movie Gravity, here’s an interesting real life International Space Station demonstration showing just how much (or little) effort it takes to move in zero gravity. While thinking about it … check out the Gravity Trailer.

Awesome photos from Saturn by Cassini probe

| July 26, 2013

It is difficult not to be in awe by the photos our space probe Cassini has sent back from near our solar systems second largest planet. — The first photo shows the distinctive rings of Saturn and the tiny blip that is our planet Earth. The second is enlarged and shows our blue marble being […]

ISS Chris Hadfield’s photo “A New Dawn” last week

| May 17, 2013

A popular 1st music video from space – Col. Chris Hadfield

| May 15, 2013

The first Canadian to walk in space, who also was the first Canadian to command the International Space Station, is now the first human to shoot a music video in space on his last day on the job.

Obituary: We lost one of our best in Neil Armstrong

| August 26, 2012

Neil Armstrong  was not only the first astronaut to walk on the moon, but a brilliant science minded and steely-nerved pilot who’s skills were the envy of his peers … as well as this small town Ohio boy. He grew up in Wapakoneta, Ohio, went to Purdue University in Indiana, flew 78 combat missions in the […]

Curiosity begins a high tech survey of Mars

| August 7, 2012

A great touch active graphic was in the online Wall Street Journal today and opened my eyes to the size of the robotic explorer. Thinking about radio controlled “buggies” of the past, I was thinking that Curiosity wasn’t all that much bigger … until I saw the comparison to the Mini Cooper – wow. Flying […]

Curiosity landed on Mars “beaming” back its first photo

| August 6, 2012

Although not the most interesting of photographs this morning, it definitely excited those who are interested in space exploration and the study of Mars. Early this morning, NASA’s billion dollar rover plunged at 13,000 mph through the thin Mars atmosphere and landed inside a giant crater. It “beamed” back this black and white photo confirming […]

Space Shuttle Discovery takes a final ride to Washington DC

| April 17, 2012

It is still quite remarkable to see NASA haul around a giant space shuttle piggybacked on a modified Boeing747, this time it is Discovery heading to its final Washington DC Smithsonian home. For those of us who grew up with the entire space program it is indeed a sad end to an adventurous and exciting […]

Venus and Jupiter easily notice in the evening sky

| March 15, 2012

This month Venus and Jupiter are putting on a great show and stand out in the evening sky. The warm temperatures and clear atmosphere gave me an excuse to sit outside and take a couple photos. (a few facts) —

Do you file a customs declaration form after space travel?

| February 29, 2012

Hmm … I’ve never given much thought to filling out a U.S. Customs form when returning from space??? I found this one from the little trip by Apollo 11 in 1969 humorous (form below). Probably should have included “Bock” by name. —

Who doesn’t love a sunrise photo, even when from space

| October 25, 2011

Sunrise and sunset photos have always been favorites of mine … this one taken by astronaut Ron Garan from space and posted on G+ is no exception. His photos of meteors plunging through the earth’s atmosphere  were made even more interesting with the addition of sound … although kind of eery (video below). —

Markets continue downtrend – NASA prepares for Mars launch

| August 5, 2011

While checking the stock market over lunch, it was again another depressing day. The Dow continues to march down as does the Nasdaq even on relatively positive news that we did have some private sector job grow and a slightly backed off unemployment claims rate of one tenth. It now stands at a high national […]

Mission complete. The Shuttle program “has come to a final stop”

| July 21, 2011

“Mission complete, Houston. After serving the world for over 30 years, the space shuttle has earned its place in history. Atlantis has come to a final stop.” — Shuttle Atlantis Pilot Doug Hurley With its recognized dual sonic booms, Space Shuttle Atlantis touched down this morning at the Kennedy Space Center completing the final scheduled […]

Photography: The night before the Shuttle Atlantis launch

| July 12, 2011

Most Internet savvy shutterbugs have seen photos or read about Trey Ratcliff, particularly those who are paying attention to High Dynamic Range (HDR) imaging. Trey Ratcliff has published many gorgeous photos and posted this one of the Shuttle Atlantis sitting on the launch pad the night before lift-off. (click image to left and also see […]

Prepare for lift-off – Space Shuttle Atlantis STS-135

| July 7, 2011

As we wait for the final scheduled liftoff of Shuttle Atlantis and STS-135 on Friday (weather postponement likely), I am of mixed emotion. As a child when the United States began its race to the moon, exploration of space was a pivotal part of being an American. As a tax paying citizen, the expense of […]

“We choose to go to the moon” speech is 50 years old

| May 29, 2011

Amazingly … President John F. Kennedy’s speech setting the goal for the United States to “go to the moon”  was given 50 years ago. Most in this country has heard parts of this speech and JFK’s delivery is burned into memory of many of my generation. For those too young to have heard the entire […]

Atlas 5 launch and Jetman scrub flights on Friday

| May 7, 2011

On Friday I was streaming the Atlas 5 rocket countdown on my computer while waiting for Yves Rossy to fly his jet wing across the Grand Canyon (see previous posts). NASA’s red anvil rule scrubbed the launch of the Atlas 5 (clouds) and according to an EAA article, Rossy felt he needed a bit more […]

Desultory - des-uhl-tawr-ee, -tohr-ee

  1. lacking in consistency, constancy, or visible order, disconnected; fitful: desultory conversation.
  2. digressing from or unconnected with the main subject; random: a desultory remark.
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!